ABOUT KCCPTS

This social venture was influenced by the following events:

  (1).

The development of the Skills-2-Pay-the-Bills curriculum in 1997 tested in several Seattle federal and Washington State Work Release facilities;

 

  (2).

The release of the Criminal Justice Project in 1999 which focused on a process for non-custodial parents (NCP) to develop a pre-release plan to meet their child support obligations;

 

  (3).

The first national U.S. Department of Justice reentry initiative called the Going Home Project in 2000 which was funded for 6-years to focus on pre/post-release planning for Serious Violent Offenders (SVOs), 18-34 years of age in Spokane, Pierce and King Counties;

 

  (4).

South Seattle College’s (SSC) intentional decision in 2000 to focus on the post-secondary education, training and re-employment needs of adults in transition from prison/jail back to our communities in King County;

 

  (5).

The first fiscal investment of SSC from 2000 to 2003 in the Life Skills-2-Work (LSW) Curriculum that Washington State Department of Corrections furthered this financial investment by contracting with SSC at their First Day Reporting Center in Bell Town and then at their Seattle Community Justice Center in 2005;

 

  (6).

In 2004 SSC was asked by King County Community Corrections, Center for Community Alternative Programs (CCAP) to start a LSW class for their post-release jail population;

 

  (7).

n late 2006 as the Going Home Project was completing its last year of funding, the King County Going Home Project Steering Committee made a strategic decision to develop a sustainability plan and that resulted in the creation of the CPTS of King County;

 

  (8).

In April 2007, King County Community Corrections contracted with SSC to open a Learning Center at the downtown Seattle CCAP location;

 

  (9).

CPTS launching local and regional monthly, quarterly and annual connecting policy and best-practice focused events to provide platforms to community partners to stay solution-centered for those served; and

 

(10).

Continually identifying and supporting the development of the next generation of leadership and succession-planning.

KCCPTS is the founding leader and a model for other efforts in WA State and the country that need to build a local customized CPTS.  Washington CPTS’ are now established in Pierce County, Snohomish County, Spokane County and 5-South West Counties CPTS.  Efforts are also underway in Kitsap County and Central Washington.

 

KCCPTS main leader, founder and facilitator, Joseph E. Garcia, has been working with people involved in the justice system for the past forty-six years.  In the past three years, Mr. Garcia has recognized a need to sustain this kind of work as the CPTS concept continues to grow in Washington State.

 

As KCCPTS’ main leader, I, Joseph E. Garcia have been working with people involved in the justice system for the past forty-six years.  In the past three years, I have recognized a need to sustain this kind of work as the CPTS concept continues to grow in Washington State.

 

KCCPTS is a highly effective team due to the level of trust amongst partners.  We are able to have crucial conversations and brainstorm public policy ideas to resolve challenges faced by the adults we serve who are transitioning to their families and communities.

 

Shortly before the strategic planning process started, CPTS stood for Community Partnership for Transition Services.  However, due to the discussions in the strategic planning process, it was recommended we change the name to Community Partnership for Transition Solutions.  This change reflects the CPTS focus on “solutions” to meet the “needs” for folks who have served their time and are transitioning back to their communities and families.

 

One of the lessons learned in this community is the reference used for individuals who were formerly incarcerated such as criminals, inmates, convicts, former prisoners, or ex-felons is offensive.  There is a stigma associated with these references.  Individuals feel they are being negatively judged by others when called ex-felons or formerly incarcerated. Their preference is justice involved, students, returning citizens or former consumers.

 

 

 

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